Didem Doğan

Delhi- tombs, minarets, mosques

After visiting the Gandhi monument we then go on with our sightseeing to some of the most important places in Delhi, which are similar to the examples of Islamic architecture we have known in Rajasthan: tombs, minarets, mosques.

Qutup Minar: Masoned upward to the sky, Qutup Minar is the world’s tallest brick-work minaret which is 73 meters high and made with brown-red stone. The Qutub Complex, consisting of other mosques, tombs, the steel column, and the madrasah along with the minaret, is located in the city center of New Delhi. Its construction started in the 12th century during the rule of Delhi Sultanate and was financed by Qutub-ud-din Aibak who bestowed his name to the edifice. This minaret is considered to be an architectural tour de force against the last Hindu kingdom in Delhi, which was defeated by the Muslims. Its daily function was also considered in its design, which allows for the singing of the prayer.

The Biggest Mosque of India, the Jama Masjid: The last architectural heritage of Mughal Emperoro Shah Jahan, predated by Taj Mahal and Crimson Castle, is the Friday Mosque, dating back to the 17th century: it is located in the city center of New Delhi and has four domes and two minarets. When you go through one of its three main gates and walk on the marble stones of its court yard, this place strikes you as a surprising experience in India which has the world’s second biggest Muslim population and many different deities. After visiting this mosque you can enjoy yourself at shops in the streets that look like Eminönü in Istanbul.

Delhi, Humayun’s Tomb: This tomb in the capitol city Delhi is a big complex of buildings that includes the graves of Babur Emperor Humayun and his family. This garden-tomb displays the influences of Iran and Islamic architecture. It also inspired the Taj Mahal.

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